How do you feel about people that are happy?

Some time ago a writer dared to publish an article about how happy she was with some of her life choices. Strangely, this caused a very large group of people to lash out at her. I think some people, when they are unhappy about their own choices, blame those that made different choices. But this is probably a better explanation:

When you centre your identity around grievance, those who are happy with their lives represent a betrayal

People are observing the backlash to Liz Breunig’s as piece as a bizarre episode of misogyny, but goes deeper than that—it’s deeply unhappy people outraged that (gasp) anyone can be generally satisfied with their life choices.

Progressives have an external locus of control—it’s the government’s fault, white supremacy’s fault, the patriarchy’s fault, etc.

Writing an essay about how you made some choices & they benefited your life is heresy. We’re supposed to be shaped by things outside our control.
Claire Lehmann

And of course we are shaped by things outside our control. But we do make choices within our own zone of control and we are responsible for those choices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Assignment and observation

This shouldn’t be a big deal but is becoming so:

Assignment is performative and implies agency whereas observation is descriptive.

In Danish, you could use “tildelt” and “observeret”.

If you see someone use the wrong word they may just have made a mistake. But they may also be trying to muddle the language with a political goal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yeah, I felt the same way

It’s from this story of a nurse trying to prove that the COVID-19 vaccines make you magnetic (’cause magnetic crystals), where a key managed to stick to her chest but not to her neck. The people in the background are the real entertainers.

Reminds me of Green Shirt Guy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sarcasm all the way down

With a reference to this, I noticed today a twitter trend. Not one of those in the sidebar (what did Henrik Dahl do today that caused him to trend? Don’t know, hardly care) but an inspired chain of retweets.

Yesterday, a British woman, Maya Forstater, won an appeal regarding protected speech, cementing the fact that it is allowed in British law to say that biological sex is real even though this fact is supposed to be scary to some people. Someone opposing Forstater quickly wrote that that doesn’t mean that Forstater was free to harass people, an obvious truth.

So a writer posted this:

It’s important to emphasize that the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to come round and steal your plasma screen tv
Oliver Burkeman

I only found Burkeman through a chain of retweets, all building on this sarcasm:

It’s important to emphasize that the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to tempt your cat away from home with Dreamies and claim it was hers all along.
Toria in McGilead

It’s important to emphasize that the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to come into your home and take all your alcohol and have a street party
Kirsty Delane

It’s important to emphasise that the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to cut branches off your tree where it’s over hanging her fence, unless she brings the cuttings round & offers to give them back.
PurpleCrow

It’s important to emphasise that the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to push her chair back on a short haul flight to Dusseldorf.
Le Canard Noir

It’s important to emphasise that the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to change her mind at the checkout and nip back for some extra noodles.
milena

It’s important to note the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to fly tip a load of old white goods into your front garden while singing Broadway hits
Dennis Noel Kavanagh

It is important to note that today’s ruling does not give Maya Forstater the right to dress up as a wolf, pretending to be a grandma, to terrorise small girls with a penchant for red capes.
Patrick

It’s important to note the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to know if Red ever did find Andy.
Aja

It’s important to note the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to smoke on the balcony of a non-smoking building even if she leans towards the street.
Actually Karen

It is important to note the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to chuck her empty McDonald’s milkshake cup out the car window onto the grass verge as she drives up the M5.
superpip

It is important to note the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to block the entry gates while she searches for either her ticket or her Oyster card.
Dr EM

It is important to note the ruling does NOT give Maya Forstater the right to put the milk in before the teabag!!!
TheFamousArtistBirdyRose

It is important to note that the ruling does not give Maya Forstater the right to book tickets to The Taming of the Shrew at The Globe, spend all afternoon in a small urban drinking pit and then disrupt theatrical proceedings with a resounding but tuneless rendition of My Way.
Alice

Rather than a stack of retweets there are multiple branches of these and I love the British sarcasm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Preposterous

It should be no surprise that I subscribe to / “follow” people who might be blocked by current social media policies. This comment about a temporary ban on Facebook was interesting:

Exactly those two points are interesting. Did she get banned for a month for using “preposterous”? From what I’ve seen it’s quite possible. Did she also get banned for another comment made 5 years ago? Also quite possible.

Which means that you probably shouldn’t base your social interactions on platforms that might suddenly decide that what you wrote 5 years prior is now unacceptable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This is not how you enforce the law

This article, “MoviePass Changed Some Passwords” by Matt Levine, explains why there seems to be so relatively many American companies that defraud private customers. It’s the final (?) story of MoviePass, a company that was built on the venerable principle of the dot com bubble of spending more money than they earned, hoping they would get someone else to foot the bill later.

Except that didn’t happen and running out of money, MoviePass found a way to be profitable:

What if MoviePass collected your $10 each month and then, when you asked it for movie tickets, it ignored you? Then it could keep collecting your $10 a month without spending money on tickets. Eventually you’d get annoyed by not getting what you paid for, and you’d try to cancel your membership and get your money back, but MoviePass could ignore that too and keep collecting the $10. Giving people unlimited movie tickets for $10 a month is a good way to get rapid customer growth; telling people you’ll give them unlimited movie tickets for $10 a month, but not actually doing it, is a way to pivot to profitability.

When I describe it like that it sounds bad, but it was actually much worse! The way MoviePass ignored its customers was by changing their passwords so they couldn’t log into their accounts.
— Matt Levine, “MoviePass Changed Some Passwords

If you read the article you’ll find that this was not something that happened at the spur of the moment. No, it was discussed at formal meetings in the company between the CEO and other executives.

The punishment? MoviePass, already shut down, its parent company, already in bankruptcy, and their two CEOs, had to promise not to do it again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why vaccinate 12-year-olds?

USA and UK has approved vaccinations against COVID-19 in those aged 12 and above, but why would we vaccinate teenagers against COVID-19?

There are few benefits for 12-year-olds; they rarely get ill, especially not seriously ill and there’s a good chance that “long COVID-19” doesn’t even exist for children.

Well, this graph by Tom Calver explains it:

So, basically it is not only to protect the children – which I believe new variants will soon put in danger till we get the global pandemic under control – but to protect those that are can’t get vaccinated or whose immune system is compromised.

See also “40m have had a Covid vaccine, so why is the Indian variant still a threat?“.

It’s also important to look to the UK where there is a sharp increase in cases at the moment, despite widespread vaccination. The answer seems obvious:

Get everyone vaccinated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Key workers are bee-usy

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Det var en mulighed mere end jeg skal bruge

Jeg ved godt hvorfor sådan en besked kommer men alligevel:

(ja, pakkenummeret er ændret af mig)

Så, her er en besked om at jeg har fået en pakke leveret.

Og, jeg får en mulighed for at følge pakken !?!

Det er naturligvis efter at jeg har fået en ordrebekræftelse, en afsendelsesmeddelelse, en trackingbesked samt en besked om at pakken ville blive leveret i dag. Det er faktisk megen kommunikation for en pakke.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Khabane “Khaby” Lame

Italian Khabane “Khaby” Lame has pretty much mastered the silent roast and in just a few weeks has become a meme in himself:

So much so that I see him daily in new memes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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